Advice

Awesome Advice, Way to Go: Is it possible for a boyfriend to not be jealous enough?

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Awesome Advice, Way to Go! By Erin Bradley

metroThe Source: Flirt Diva, Metro UK

The Dilemma: “I’ve been with my guy for about a year now… There’s just one thing I don’t get — when we go out and I get attention (which I often do, something to do with my long, blond hair) he doesn’t bat an eyelid. It’s like he couldn’t care less… I’m starting to get the feeling that he doesn’t care because he’s not that into me. Thoughts?”

The Advice: “Let me begin by asking you this — is it possible you suffer delusions of grandeur?… The only thing you need to worry about is him catching onto the fact that you are one high maintenance lady!”

The Rebuttal: Jealousy isn’t cool, but neither is complete and utter lack of acknowledgment, even if it’s just a playful, “I noticed that intellectual giant in the Ed Hardy shirt asked you out when I went to the bathroom. Are we still on for next weekend?” Everyone wants to feel valued. In rare, controlled doses jealousy can help reinforce that feeling. Speaking of the J-word, twenty bucks says you’re a brunette, Flirt Diva.

 

drk

The Source: Dr. Diana Kirschner, assisted by “Blogger Pup” Madison

The Dilemma: You’re shy when it comes to meeting men.

The Advice: Have no fear. Dr. K lays it all out in her YouTube video that’s a must-see-to-believe production. In it, she advises women to “align with your Beautiful Diamond Self” (whatever that is) and always be primped and ready to meet men, even if you’re coming home from the gym: “It’s very important to put yourself together and give yourself a lift.” She goes on to name different personas that women can adopt, even dressing Madison the Pomeranian in a slutty doggie onesie to demonstrate something she calls “The Saucy Vixen.”

The Rebuttal: Isn’t it enough that women are working their asses off and working out their asses? Now they’re supposed to put on makeup based on the 1-in-1,000 chance they’ll meet someone walking out of the gym? Once in a while, sure, but all the time? Treating every social appearance like it’s an audition is exhausting, not to mention bad for your self-esteem.

 

womenshealthThe Source: He Said /She Said, Women’s Health

The Dilemma: “My husband seems frustrated that my career is more successful than his, although he denies it. What should I say?”

The Advice: “Your best play: Don’t give career advice (too condescending) and don’t tell him you understand how he feels (too pitying). Just drop it. Give the impression it’s no big deal and eventually he’ll get that it isn’t.”

The Rebuttal: I’m with you on the unsolicited career advice, but what you call pity, I call empathy. It’s something everyone needs, even tough guys who pour grain alcohol on their Cheerios and break rocks with their penises. Ignoring someone who’s acting out only leads to his acting more pissy. Which makes you more pissy, and so on and so forth. Be supportive and let him know you’re there if he needs you.

 

phillyThe Source: Steve & Mia, Philadelphia Daily News

The Dilemma: “I’m a high school senior and feel pretty lonely right now. Most of the kids I know are into sex and drugs, and because I’m not, I’ve been excluded from a lot of fun events. The kids who want to be friendly with me are dull and uninteresting. Do I lower my standards just to roll with the kids I like? Or should I suffer until I get to college in the fall?”

The Advice: “Suffer until you get to college. For one thing, college will open up whole new worlds of interests and people for you. For another, you’ll feel proud about the restraint and self-discipline you showed by sticking to your principles.”

The Rebuttal: Not to crush anyone’s dreams, but the majority of people drink and have sex in college. You want sober and chaste? Enroll in BJ University, where the core curriculum is anything but blowjobs. No one is excluded from high-school events because they don’t drink or screw. Most high schoolers love having a straight friend around. They soothe suspicious parents and make excellent designated drivers. What high school kids don’t like are people who act like they’re better than everyone else, something I suspect you’re guilty of if you can’t hang with either crowd. Stick to your principles, but be more tactful about it.