Your film The Anniversary Party largely concerns celebrities losing their shit at a party. How much of it was based in reality?
Oh, a lot. I think the biggest thing we did was use a lot of characteristics of friends of ours. And Jennifer [Jason Leigh] and I said very truthful things about ourselves — not always nice things. We wrote for certain people, using the cadence of their voices, and wrote variations of different friends of ours, just mercilessly plundered their lives. And you can hear it, I think, especially through the actors and actresses whose lives you might have heard a lot about.

You did a version of Macbeth where you played every part. Who's the sexiest character in Shakespeare?
Ah, I'd say Hamlet, even though it kind of did my head in. I did enjoy playing Duncan, because I based him on this horrible Scottish politician I don't like. I like playing Lady Macbeth, she's always fun.

In 2005, you called yourself "the acceptable public face of sexual ambiguity." Eight years later, what's changed about the public's perception of people who don't identify as gay or straight?
Well, it's talked about more. People are more cognizant and understanding of the idea that you might be gay, but that you might love the feel of a girl's breasts, for example. It's not so shocking that a straight person might have a little, you know, fumble. I think the idea that our sexual classifications aren't so black and white is good. I'm all for gray.

You released an album a few years ago. Can you give me a romantic playlist?
That Taylor Swift one, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together." The theme from Love Story. "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing," and then... "Fuck You," by Cee-Lo Green. And actually, Any Day Now ends with "I Shall Be Released." That's a pretty good one for a date. I hope I shall be released, anyway, if I get enough booze in you [laughs].

In 2000, you spoke to the London Sunday Herald about how the public’s expectations of what a man’s body should look like had become ridiculous. Have we made any progress in that?
I'm actually really happy about how things have gone. When I said that, we were sort of in the middle of this big, buff, Chelsea boy muscle-man look everywhere. And bizarrely, they're not very strong, those people, because it's all artifice. You can pin them down, and they won't be able to get up — I've tried. I once had sex with this big muscle person, a long long time ago, and I thought it was so fascinating. He wasn't very flexible, it was a bit like [mimes stiff-armed walk], you know? Like the Michelin Man. And that's not so au courant anymore. I think leaner, fitter bodies are coming back into vogue, and that's just better, healthier.

And you can't pin them down as easily.
Exactly. They can put up more of a struggle.

Commentarium

comments powered by Disqus