Love & Sex

Is Female Ejaculation Even Real?

Pin it

Five of the biggest myths, debunked.

Beyond serving as a go-to source for vital reproductive care, the folks at Planned Parenthood— a team of experts in medicine, sexual health, and law — are passionate, informed advocates for knowing your own body. PP's very own Kendall McKenzie tackled the tricky topic of female ejaculation over at Refinery 29

Here at Planned Parenthood, we get a fair amount of questions about female ejaculation. Before I clear up some of the biggest misconceptions, here’s a brief primer about female ejaculation, also known as squirting: People with vulvas have tissue surrounding their urethra, called the urethral sponge, which is part of the internal clitoris and is actually very similar to the erectile tissue in dude packages. When you’re turned on, the clitoris and urethral sponge swell and become more sensitive — like a hard-on for your vag. There are tiny glands in and right next to the urethra, called Skene’s or paraurethral glands, and they can fill with fluid as you’re gettin’ busy. Ejaculation happens when that fluid is expelled from the urethra and/or Skene’s glands during sexual stimulation.

There is a LOT of misinformation surrounding this relatively unexplored aspect of sex, so head over to Refinery 29 to debunk the five biggest myths about female ejaculation.