Love & Sex

The Monster Porn Genre Is Quickly Being Erased From Amazon

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Say goodbye to Bigfoot's big feet.

If the book title "Cum for Bigfoot" piques the interest of the inner woodsman or woman in you, then you probably will be disappointed to learn that all of your monster porn is quickly being deleted by the censors at Amazon. 

If you're not one of the thousands of American consumers who frequently select close fantastical monsters as their go-to erotica, then you might not be familiar with the genre of monster porn. Humping at night to things that go bump in the night: it's big. As about as larger-than-life as its own mammoth heroes -wooly, fanged, finned, and horny.

A notable purveyor of monster porn, author Virginia Wade, writes a hugely popular series in which women are sexually assaulted by Bigfoot during camping trips in the woods. (It's okay, though, according to the plot. Monsters come with proportionally monster-sized equipment.) She took her ultra niche books to Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, a self-publisher that gives its authors a 70 percent royalty rate, which is way higher than mainstream publishers. During 2012, the book was downloaded over 100,000 times. "My mom did the German translations" — including the equally popular "Komm für Bigfoot," Wade told Business Insider, stressing the success of her series. 

In fact, the whole genre of monster porn, formally called Cryptozoological porn, is wildly successful on these e-publishing sites. That includes erotic fiction featuring minotaurs, mermen, aliens, cyclops, demons, and just about any kind of devilish creature known to the imagination. The books made the authors thousands per month, with low months rounding out to about $4,000. That is, until news leaked that these self-publishers, like Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and WHSmith, were allowing all manner of content in their works at large:  rape, bestiality, and child abuse. The publishers started deleting their questionable content, and with it, the monster porn. 60 percent of Wade's titles disappeared. To worm her way through the censorship, she changed racier titles like "Cum for Bigfoot" to the more tepid and tame, "Moan for Bigfoot". Other monster porn authors are trying this method to get reshelved, too. But the ban continues to spread as the majority of Amazoners aren't exactly titillated by the Lochness Monster.

Amazon's response? A shrug. "What we deem offensive is probably about what you would expect," Amazon's policy says, rather vaguely. And if you're thinking "Big Foot Did Me From Behind and I Liked It," is an easy shoo-in for the offensive column, well, you'd be wrong. That literary jewel is still on the shelves.

[h/t Business Insider]

Image via Amazon.