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FTC: Pomegranate juice can’t cure heart disease, boner problems

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Pomegranate juice POM

The makers of the POM line of pomegranate-based drinks are in trouble with the Federal Trade Commission, accused of lying about the health benefits of their products. They had been warned not to make "false and unsubstantiated claims that their products will prevent or treat heart disease, prostate cancer, and erectile dysfunction." Of course, POM ignored these warnings and now they face unspecified penalties from the government.

POM is not helping its case by ignoring the requests and by making outrageous and completely unsubstantiated claims that their juice is almost half as effective as Viagra. Where would they even get that kind of a figure, asks NPR?:

Among the claims catching the eyes of the regulators were claims like "Super Health Powers" and "30 Percent Decrease In Arterial Plaque" and "Promotes Healthy Blood Vessels." The company said at the time that all statements it made were true and supported by scientific research.

For example, POM claims that its products are 40 percent as effective as Viagra. We're not sure how they tested that, but the FTC complaint says the study the company relied on actually showed that the juice wasn't any more effective than a placebo.

There's more where that came from at NPR.org.