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American Apparel drops sexy women from its ads, starts focusing on Dov Charney’s sad childhood

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American Apparel

Dov Charney, everyone's favorite boundary-pushing pervert, may, well, not be a pervert anymore. After American Apparel's recently released ads, featuring transparent underwear and a prominent pubic hair, the company received a lot of flak. AA's newest ad campaign is what everyone's wanted all along — an ad campaign that certainly doesn't showcase porn and relates to youth using their interests (no, not their interest in sex). The newest photo they're featuring is, aww, the darkroom Dov Charney made as an eleven-year-old boy! The ad includes a blurb with the following highlights: 

Since his early years, Dov Charney has used photography as a means of self-expression, in spite of his childhood dyslexia. According to Dov's mother Sylvia, his interest in photography began when he was about seven years old, when he became obsessed with submitting a photograph for a competition. It was at that time that he set up a makeshift darkroom in his mother's closet, where he developed film and made small contact sheets with a light bulb. "His first major photo essay was a series of photographs he shot during a mid-1970s teachers strike in Quebec City," explains his mother. "The central focus of his work has been the urban vernacular and the people in the city."

 He "used photography as a means of self-expression, in spite of his childhood dyslexia?" So what, then, does American Apparel's photography express? Naked ladies make boners? Sexually exploiting women makes money? Dov, I'll take bushes and ladies on all fours before I'll be tricked into believing you're about anything else. And that childhood dyslexia tidbit? You guys are really pulling out all the stops.