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Christine Baranski thinks “Pan Am” and “The Playboy Club” are appallingly sexist

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Christine Baranski, currently a formidable litigator on The Good Wife, thinks the two new TV dramas following in Mad Men's '60s slipstream, Pan Am and The Playboy Club, are retrograde and sexist. In an interview, she said "I'm rather appalled that they're now making television shows about Playboy bunnies and stewardesses. I think, 'Really? Haven't we gone past that, well past that?'"

The recent hornet's nest that was stirred up by a relevant-again Gloria Steinem (a new documentary, Gloria: In Her Own Words, airs Monday on HBO) with her call for a boycott of The Playboy Club, believing that it "normalizes prostitution and male dominance," makes one wonder: Are these the stirrings of an incipient fourth-wave feminism? Is this retro-chic resentment and rebellion against caricatures of caricatures a re-ignition of passions that spawned movements, or is it merely a flare-up? Will liking or disliking Pan Am and The Playboy Club be some kind of feminist litmus test? And is Malcolm Gladwell bummed about Pan Am's smoking ban?

The fifty-nine-year-old Emmy-winning Baranski admitted to not having seen either of the new shows yet, but believes that "the sexual commodification of women continues," and "may be worse than ever." She does, however, have positive things to say about Mad Men:

"I think it deals with where women were at that time. It's not exploitative, it's a wonderful look back at the way things were, how women were treated, how they looked and what the sexual mores were. And if anything, it should be a cautionary tale, like, 'Let's not go back there.'"

I wonder what Baranski thought about the season-four episode where Lane takes his father and Don… to the New York Playboy Club.