Scanner

Porn movie downloaders hit with lawsuits seeking to learn their identities

Pin it

Debbie Does Dallas cover

Have you ever downloaded a porn movie? (The answer: yes. Come on, pretty much everyone has done it at least once.) If so, you may not be cloaked by the vague air of anonymity on the internet, especially if one of these three new lawsuits succeeds:

In the past few weeks, massive numbers of alleged anonymous copyright pirates have been sued. It seems one adult entertainment studio after another is filing complaints against John Doe defendants.

[T]hree more lawsuits were filed on behalf of three different companies — Hard Drive Prods, Lightspeed Media and Millenium TGA. Each is suing 100 nameless defendants accused of stealing copyrighted audio-visual works. The litigation follows at least three other suits filed in the past two weeks, targeting hundreds of others, over content ranging from gay erotica to the cult classic Debbie Does Dallas.

Lawyer John L. Steele is the tireless litigator emulating the RIAA's new moneymaking/customer harassment model, saying he wants to reduce "P2P-based content piracy." That or collect ridiculously inflated damage amounts for his clients — with 50 percent off the top for himself, of course. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Steele seeks to have IP addresses of illegal porn downloaders (that is, everyone who has ever downloaded a porn video from the internet) revealed in discovery, whereupon the "Plaintiff will seek leave of the Court to amend this Complaint to state those identities, if necessary."